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Lake Winnecook

Also known as Unity Pond, Lake Winnecook is a small waterbody at 2,528 acres surrounded by the towns of Burnham, Troy, and Unity. It has a maximum depth of just 37 feet. Located in Central Maine, it drains to the Sebasticook River via Twenty-Five Mile Stream. This stream usually acts as an outlet but during periods of high water, it reverses and becomes an inlet. Nestled between rolling farmlands to the east and extensive bog areas to the west, the pond offers a tremendous diversity of fishing opportunities. Anglers may access Lake Winnecook via a public access facility located off Kanokolus Road in Unity. The lake is well marked with navigational buoys which are maintained by Friends of Lake Winnecook.

Nearby Unity College, with a mission of environmental stewardship, uses Lake Winnecook and its watershed as a model for science classes and research. The college supports Lake Winnecook water quality projects.

Lake Winnecook provides excellent habitat for warm water gamefishes. Good populations of largemouth and smallmouth bass, perch, pickerel, and other warm water species provide anglers with many hours of fishing enjoyment. Black crappies have recently migrated to the lake from other waters in the Sebasticook drainage and are a principal fishery. White perch can also keep the intested angler busy.


Outgoing President's Message

Rick Kersbergen
November 11, 2016

It sure has been an interesting summer and fall on the lake! The water levels continue to be extremely low with little to no water leaving the lake through 25 Mile Stream. The deer are headed to the lake for water as many of their traditional water sources have dried up!

On a positive note, the clarity of the water has been the best since I have been taking water quality measurements. This phenomenon is consistent with other lakes in Maine as well. I am hoping that this trend continues, but am concerned when we do get heavy rains, that runoff from homes, roads, lawns and fields will probably deliver enough phosphorus to the lake to support an algal bloom. This summer does prove that reducing runoff and keeping soil in place on our properties will improve the lake! If you want to learn how to reduce phosphorus runoff from your property, sign up for a Lake Smart evaluation of your property. It is a great way to learn some best management practices that will help!

Our CBI program had a record number of boat and trailer inspections this year at the Kanaokolus boat launch. Our CBI inspector, Kyle Pisano, did a great job talking to boaters and checking boats and trailers for possible invasive plants. While boats did come out of the lake with attached plant material at times, none of the plants were determined to be invasive. We need to thank the town of Unity, Maine DEP and the Lakes Environmental Association (LEA) for helping us keep this program going and helping to fund the project.

Jennifer Galik has offered to help format our newsletter--taking over from our past Treasurer Joe Foley who did it for many years. Thank you Jennifer! At our last meeting, we had several Unity College students participate and volunteer to do some projects. I am really excited about the continued interaction with the school and the help they can bring to the mission of Friends of Lake Winnecook! Finally, The Maine Lakes Society has a great resource called the Maine Lake Book! A PDF version of The Lake Book 2016 is available. They will be publishing an updated and expanded edition in 2017.



The Forgotten Pond

Unity College student Steven Beason published this as a senior project in May 2015.